Beautiful Montagnana

There are pearls set between ancient walls and ramparts. They are the walled cities of the Province of Padua, authentic wonders of history, art and culture. Cittadella, Monselice, Este and Montagnana, as well as obviously Padua.

Montagnana main piazza

Cities where the present speaks of craftsmanship, food and wine and many new tourist itineraries!

But also Verona, Soave, Asolo; there are about 25 walled cities in the Veneto region alone.

A Most Beautiful Village

Montagnana a small town in the province of Padua is completely surrounded by Medieval walls.

This small town has been awarded the “Orange Flag“🔹 for its historical beauty and for the enhancement of typical products, it is also part of the association “The Most Beautiful Villages.” In 2018 was recognized among the localities “Spighe Verdi” (Green Spikes).🔹🔹

In addition to the extraordinary fortified complex, the city is appreciated for its urban fabric, made up of streets and buildings built in the Renaissance period and, partly, during the economic recovery of the 19th century.

The Duomo (1431–1502) stretches out over the central square, with its imposing late Gothic forms with Renaissance additions. Inside there are various paintings by Paolo Veronese, Giovanni Buonconsiglio, and probably Giorgione.

The Duomo was closed during my visit, because of COVID restrictions in an effort to avoid assembling.

In the square it is possible the elegant Palazzo Valeri and the ancient Monte di Pietà (pawnshop). In the nearby via Matteotti stands the Magnavin-Foratti palace, a refined Venetian-Gothic style palace.

Porticos

Montagnana has many porticos almost in every street, lined with pretty stores and restaurants and bars with tables and chairs al fresco.

A lunch/dinner stop in Montagnana is a welcomed and tasty pause.

The Walls

The current walls, which constitute one of the most distinguished and best preserved examples of medieval military architecture in the EU, date back to the mid-fourteenth century, when the Carraresi, Lords of Padua, wanted to expand and strengthen this essential strong frontier place of the Paduan state against the Verona of the Scaligeri.

They were very belligerent people back then.

Around the walls there was a large moat, and all around the area were impassable swamps, or flooded floodplains in case of war, so that the walled city was the key to the Paduan border towards the west.

🔹 The Orange flag is a recognition of tourist-environmental quality conferred by the Italian Touring Club (TCI) to small Italian municipalities (maximum 15,000 inhabitants) which stand out for their offer of excellence and quality hospitality

🔹🔹 Spighe Verdi is a national recognition conferred by the FEE Italia (Foundation for Environmental Education) on Italian locations that promote sustainable rural development. The Spighe Verdi program is aimed at rural municipalities that intend to enhance sustainable development of the territory, care for the environment and defense of the landscape.

All of the above makes Montagnana a good destination for an off the beaten path visit.

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I lived the most part of my life in Washington DC, now in Italy getting to know again my country. Plenty of surprises, for good and bad, and lots of nostalgia for DC.

5 thoughts on “Beautiful Montagnana

  1. I was due to visit Padua before the coronavirus hit, so will be heading there once restrictions are lifted, but I hadn’t heard of Montagnana before…will definitely try and fit in a visit there, it’s just so pretty!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I hope you can travel soon. We all hope so.
      Padova is beautiful and has a lot to offer. For a day off to the country Montagnana is a very good idea. There are other such small pearls nearby worth visiting, and the country side is lovely with his sweet hills. I’m writing something on Este next which is next to Montagnana.
      Hopefully, I can travel to Arqua Petrarca too, and a visit to the Catajo Castle.
      All worth a visit.

      Liked by 1 person

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