In Italian “Mushrooms “ = “Porcini”

Boletus edulis: “A fungus that grows in deciduous and coniferous forests and tree plantations.”

But we prefer to call it Porcino. It seems less intellectual and more edible!

Porcino is a prized ingredient in various culinary dishes, it is held in high regard in Italian cuisine mostly in the northern area, where Porcini are found easily in our mountains, and “going for mushrooms” is a nice way to spend a weekend.

If one knows what is doing, knows the territory, and knows the mushrooms. Or else it can be a dangerous adventure!

By late August/September, porcini are easily found in farmer’s markets, and supermarkets. It is not easy on your budget though! It is still a rather costly item.

But a few go a long way, and the dry type are also a good alternative.

The fresh ones should be treated with the same care as for heirloom jewelry. They should be cleaned carefully and washed quickly. (Some suggest not to wash them at all, just brush the dirt off… 🤔😏 I do all the recommended cleaning, … but I also give them a quick wash).

Quickly and Easy

After carefully slicing the, making sure to keep the ”mushroom” silhouette so that everybody knows what is in their plate, they are just sauteed in oil (for me also a bit of butter because I like the taste), some garlic, a splash of white wine, and a sprinkle of parsley, they are ready to enhance a few masterpieces of Italian cuisine:

Risotto

Fettuccine

Polenta and Mushrooms (and if there is still room in your cholesterol numbers, add some cheese!)

Gnocchi

Scallopine with Mushrooms

If you are still mild about mushrooms just think thatt, the mushroom is low in fat and digestible carbohydrates, and high in protein, vitamins, minerals and dietary fibre.

What’s not to like? … The cost maybe?

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I lived the most part of my life in Washington DC, now in Italy getting to know again my country. Plenty of surprises, for good and bad, and lots of nostalgia for DC.

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